Rising up from indian country keating ann durkin. HEPPAS Books: Up from Indian 2019-02-21

Rising up from indian country keating ann durkin Rating: 9,4/10 1293 reviews

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rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

Pertinent portraits, engravings, and photographs grace the work. Unfortunately, what is a fantastic book regarding the early history of Chicago will be forever tainted by Keating's oddly presented Epilogue. She also responded to questions. Published to commemorate the bicentennial of the Battle of Fort Dearborn, this gripping account of the birth of Chicago will become required reading for anyone seeking to understand the city and its complex origins. The book is a landmark work, deeply researched and vividly written. Like the native tribes and the trappers and traders who dealt with them, the author ranges throughout the region but has a particular focus on Chicago. She highlights such figures as Jean Baptiste Point de Sable and John Kinzie and demonstrates that early Chicago was a place of cross-cultural reliance among the French, the Americans, and the Native Americans.

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Rising Up from Indian Country: The Battle of Fort Dearborn and the Birth of Chicago by Ann Durkin Keating

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

There was substantial trade between fur traders and Native Americans, which was one of the reasons that made it so difficult for Indian tribes to resist the encroachment of their territory by white Americans. Rising Up from Indian Country adds depth and breadth to an understanding of the geographic, social, and political transitions that occurred on the shores of Lake Michigan in the early 1800s. I love reading about Chicago's tumultuous last and this book provides a fascination, thorough glimpse into what few Chicagoans really know behind the origins of their city, the first star on its flag, and the Battle of Fort Dearborn. She talked about the early history of the area that would become Chicago, the role that the 1812 massacre at Fort Dearborn played in the settling of the territories, and the early life of Chicago. Its transformation from a trading post to an outpost of U.

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rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

The author paints a picture that is nearly idyllic, with much intermingling and mutual profit. She highlights such figures as Jean Baptiste Point de Sable and John Kinzie and demonstrates that early Chicago was a place of cross-cultural reliance among the French, the Americans, and the Native Americans. Rising Up from Indian Countrypaints a compelling picture of Chicago's Indian Country origins and skillfully describes the tragedy at Fort Dearborn from the perspective of all who participated. Central characters, John Kinzie, Tecumseh, Blackhawk, Black Patridge, the Ouilmette family, and one-day-to-be president William Henry Harrison. For example, there are instances where detailed facts are repeated on the same page.

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Rising Up from Indian Country

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

The Indians were however already advanced in their knowledge of agriculture — that is, the women were. In under an hour, fifty-two members of Heald's party were killed, and the rest were taken prisoner; the Potawatomi then burned Fort Dearborn before returning to their villages. A cultural gaffe with bloody consequences. Bowes, Journal of American History Ann Durkin Keating is professor of history at North Central College in Naperville, Illinois. However, I would recommend not reading the Epilogue, as it flies in the face of Keating's own presentation of the details of the massacre. She is also, to my taste, careless in her repeated reference to the death of Jean Lalime in an altercation with Kinzie as a murder. The conflict of August 15, 1812, was not a battle.

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Rising Up from Indian Country

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

On the morning of August 15, the military troops fed hundreds of Indians surrounding the fort, and gave away numerous valuable goods to them as well excepting alcohol and gun powder. When Scandinavian immigrants and Dakota Indians lived side by side on a turn-of-the-century reservation, each struggled independently to preserve their language and culture. The book is a landmark work, deeply researched and vividly written. I've only known bare bones history of Chicago and the Great Lakes, and I delighted in the ways Keating has filled in the gaps of my knowledge - about the geography of villages and settlements, the many races and ethnicities of people who lived intermingled with one another across a large area, the hunting, farming, trading and trapping that was the foundation of the economy for hundreds of years, and how over a few decades in the early 19th century, the Indians were eventually bought, bribed, th I've only known bare bones history of Chicago and the Great Lakes, and I delighted in the ways Keating has filled in the gaps of my knowledge - about the geography of villages and settlements, the many races and ethnicities of people who lived intermingled with one another across a large area, the hunting, farming, trading and trapping that was the foundation of the economy for hundreds of years, and how over a few decades in the early 19th century, the Indians were eventually bought, bribed, threatened, and pushed out. Placing the women and children near the supplies was a terrible mistake, as it put them directly in harm's way.

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Rising Up from Indian Country: The Battle of Fort Dearborn and the Birth of Chicago, Keating

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

She highlights such figures as Jean Baptiste Point de Sable and John Kinzie and demonstrates that early Chicago was a place of cross-cultural reliance among the French, the Americans, and the Native Americans. The group included several dozen soldiers, as well as nine women and eighteen children. Please have the disability coordinator at your school fill out. It is clear, concise, and appropriately footnoted. Chicago was essentially a fur trading outpost during the years before the War of 1812 and it continued in that role until 1827-1828.

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Rising Up from Indian Country : Ann Durkin Keating : 9780226428963

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

After traveling only a mile and a half, they were attacked by five hundred Potawatomi warri In August 1812, under threat from the Potawatomi, Captain Nathan Heald began the evacuation of ninety-four people from the isolated outpost of Fort Dearborn to Fort Wayne, hundreds of miles away. In recounting the aftermath of the attack on the retreating Fort Dearborn garrison, she points out that while the acts of cruelty, particularly in that many children were massacred, were shocking, there were also many individual acts of mercy and kindness that were instrumental in restoring the society in Chicago in coming years. Tenskwatana was the brother of Tecumseh and both had migrated to Tippecanoe from Ohio. But then there is the Epilogue. You can change your cookie settings at any time.

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Rising Up from Indian Country

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

It seems to me that this regional and character ambivalence weakens the book; it would have been better if a clear choice had been made between these alternatives. The group included several dozen soldiers, as well as nine women and eighteen children. Similarly, the author introduces a wide range of characters yet at the same time focusses on the career of John Kinzie, a major player in the area but also a figure whose own life was emblematic of the cultural crosscurrents in the Old Northwest. After traveling only a mile and a half, they were attacked by five hundred Potawatomi warriors. She has cut through the fog of legend to give us a valuable look at Chicago when it was still Indian Country. Keating effortlessly weaves detailed Fort Dearborn history with the broader early pre-settlement history of Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan so that the reader better understands the context of the Indian uprising that occurred August 15, 1812. But this book provides something just as important for a wider audience.

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Rising Up from Indian Country

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

With Rising up from Indian Country, noted historian Ann Durkin Keating richly recounts the Battle of Fort Dearborn while situating it within the context of several wider histories that span the nearly four decades between the 1795 Treaty of Greenville, in which Native Americans gave up a square mile at the mouth of the Chicago River, and the 1833 Treaty of Chicago, in which the American government and the Potawatomi exchanged five million acres of land west of the Mississippi River for a tract of the same size in northeast Illinois and southeast Wisconsin. Keating has researched her tale well, but employs a pedestrian writing style, marred by a tendency to repeat herself by reformulation. Well researched and written, this book is an eye-opening account of Chicago's earliest, most contested days. In the first book devoted entirely to this crucial period, Keating tells a story not only of military conquest but of the lives of people on all sides of the conflict. Tecumseh was killed in October, 1813 while fighting for the British in Canada during the War of 1812. We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website.

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Ann Durkin Keating. Rising Up from Indian Country: The Battle of Fort Dearborn and the Birth of Chicago.

rising up from indian country keating ann durkin

This is a dramatic story that invites readers both to absorb new facts about the past and to reflect upon their meaning. The book is a landmark work, deeply researched and vividly written. The group included several dozen soldiers, as well as nine women and eighteen children. Rising Up from Indian Country adds depth and breadth to an understanding of the geographic, social, and political transitions that occurred on the shores of Lake Michigan in the early 1800s. Published to commemorate the bicentennial of the Battle of Fort Dearborn, this gripping account of the birth of Chicago will become required reading for anyone seeking to understand the city and its complex origins.

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