The stones of london hollis leo. Leo Hollis 2019-01-26

The stones of london hollis leo Rating: 8,8/10 1355 reviews

The Stones of London: a History in Twelve Buildings by Leo Hollis: review

the stones of london hollis leo

Giants, dwarfs and magic all bubble in the mix - along with a dash of romance. The problem is that once you have gotten your nifty new product, the the stones of london hollis leo gets a brief glance, maybe a once over, but it often tends to get discarded or lost with the original packaging. From the Roman forum to the Gherkin, Regent Street to the East End, the Houses of Parliament to Greenwich Palace, London's buildings are testament to the richness of its past. The history-through-famous-buildings approach is relatively familiar from guidebooks. Constructing a panoramic view of London, doing justice to the buildings, and bringing out themes and insights about past and present urban life, is a formidable agenda. The story of London, told through twelve of its most seminal buildings. Wednesday 1st June 2011 6:30pm - 7:30pm Literary Event London's architecture holds the key to a rich and fascinating history.

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The Stones of London: A History in Twelve Buildings, By Leo Hollis

the stones of london hollis leo

So in recounting John Nash's inspired but slapdash approach to urban planning as he created Regent Street, we learn about how the Prince Regent splashed his cash and why Buckingham Palace was something of a damp and dreary also-ran as royal addresses go. The spare, simple narrative tightens the tension in every page and keeps you reading. Behind the facades of these buildings lie the stories of the people, ideas and events that took place within them and that caused their creation. I love this book and I think anyone who likes London would enjoy it. This is fascinating social history presented in blog form, and is a terrific younger entrant into the burgeoning history blog scene. Behind the facades of these buildings lie the stories of the people, ideas and events that took place within them and that caused their creation. The story of London, told through twelve of its most seminal buildings.

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The Stones of London: A History in Twelve Buildings by Leo Hollis

the stones of london hollis leo

They all have very human stories, of the men and women who dreamed and lived their lives in London, leaving their imprint upon the fabric of the capital. Alongside the detailed planning of Westminster Abbey we get bite-sized chunks of basic history. I found this fascinating, although, for me, the more modern chapters were more engrossing than the earlier ones. Mary Axe, better known as The Gherkin. You are very welcome to comment and use the information here to inspire your own reading, but please don't reproduce material from this site without contacting me first. He starts with pre-Roman ruin and ends with 30 St. And while the shortlist used as wayposts through the past inevitably means missing many of London's landmarks, many famous places crop up in entries nominally about others.

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The Stones of London: A History in Twelve Buildings, By Leo Hollis

the stones of london hollis leo

Please get in touch for more information on sources or images. While Hollis is excellent on history, I found that his final chapter on modern and future London veered off into a mishmash of social-networking speak, architectural jargon and an all-too-brisk summing up of the whole book. Its mad have been placed on the couch, its poor pored over and its rich laid bare. Stories within stories tumble out like Russian dolls. The pages almost turned themselves as my brain was effortlessly filled with data normally the preserve of scholarly classicists. But Hollis holds these disparate elements together with skill, constructing with the stones of London a story that is much greater than the sum of its parts. Leo Hollis's is to explore London's history through 12 buildings.

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The Stones of London: A History in Twelve Buildings, By Leo Hollis

the stones of london hollis leo

These places provide Hollis with his structure. The stories are great and he covers some of my favorite London sites, such as Greenwich, Westminster Abbey, The Royal Exchange and Wembley Stadium. In a densely populated city he, he devised a plan to recapture land from the banks of the Thames and create an elegant edge to the growing city to house essential infrastructure. Join him for a glimpse behind these buildings' facades to discover the people, ideas and events which have shaped one of the world's most enigmatic cities. A beguiling device; a stalking horse of Palladian proportions. You can find more through the tags if a subject catches your eye. There's a real sense of deepening menace.

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Leo Hollis

the stones of london hollis leo

In Hollis's previous book, The Phoenix, he used the lives of five men Sir Christopher Wren; the gardener-diarist, John Evelyn; the scientist, Robert Hooke; the philosopher, John Locke and the builder, Nicholas Barbon as the prism through which to view the birth of London after the fire of 1666. London's history has been told by countless authors. . Behind the facades of these buildings lie the stories of the people, ideas and events that took place within them and that caused their creation. So, even for a history fan with a taste for the place, it takes a clever theme or a neat gimmick to make yet another account of the capital's past seem appealing.

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The Stones of London: A History in Twelve Buildings, By Leo Hollis

the stones of london hollis leo

The stories are great and he covers some of my favorite London sites, such as Greenwich, Westminster Abbey, The Royal Exchange and Wembley Stadium. Hollis uses the social context of each structure's conception funding design, construction and changing function to illustrate how buildings have defined London and therefore England, Britain and the empire. Advertisement Leo Hollis has organised his history of London around a mere 12 buildings. While he touches on architectural issues most of what he covers are the sociopolitical history surrounding the structures. Behind the facades of these buildings lie the stories of the people, ideas and events that took place within them and that caused their creation. While he touches on architectural issues most of what he covers are the sociopolitical history surrounding the structures. They are arranged chronologically but are made to engage thematically with a wide range of metropolitan concerns.

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Reading : The Stones Of London Hollis Leo

the stones of london hollis leo

The Stones Of London Hollis Leo can be very useful guide, and the stones of london hollis leo play an important role in your products. Its biography has been written and rewritten. In The Stones of London, Hollis tells the story of London by examining the history of twelve buildings. Buildings transform and mutate: Greenwich Palace, for instance, started as a collection of houses for the Duke of Gloucester; it progressed from a pleasure palace to a hospital, to the University of Greenwich campus. These complaints aside, this is an imaginative book that finds a convincing new way to tell the story of one of the most written-about cities in the world. He does so by focusing on 12 buildings that span the centuries. Behind the facades of these buildings lie the stories of the people, ideas and events that took place within them and that caused their creation.

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The Stones of London: a History in Twelve Buildings by Leo Hollis: review

the stones of london hollis leo

From the Roman forum to the Gherkin, Regent Street to the East End, the Houses of Parliament to Greenwich Palace, London's buildings are testament to the richness of its past. He switches perspectives effortlessly, moving from local to national to international and back again in the space of a few paragraphs. Synopsis The story of London, told through twelve of its most seminal buildings. My favorite chapter tell of the Vic In The Stones of London, Hollis tells the story of London by examining the history of twelve buildings. Roz Kaveney in Times Literary Supplement 'Womack excels at vivid and lyrical phrasing. It's a mixture of grand architectural projects, feats of engineering, reworkings of old quarters and domestic and suburban dwellings.

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The Stones of London: A History in Twelve Buildings. Leo Hollis by Leo Hollis

the stones of london hollis leo

Behind the facades of these buildings lie the stories of the people, ideas and events that took place within them and that caused their creation. Under the Romans it was briefly called Augusta and from the ashes of that settlement was born the centre of an empire — a city that is truly august. One problem is perhaps that Hollis is trying to do too much. Hollis has chosen his building well: their stories present an original perspective on London's complex history. The blog covers the period between 1660 and 1836, but Georgian London keeps things nice and simple. From the Roman forum to the Gherkin, Regent Street to the East End, the Houses of Parliament to Greenwich Palace, London's buildings are testament to the richness of its past.

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