Woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby. Dr. Kristina Horn Sheeler, Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture 2019-03-20

Woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby Rating: 7,2/10 1421 reviews

Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture by Kristina Horn Sheeler

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. She is coauthor of two books: and. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates-one that is expressed in both political and popular culture. Pundits have been predicting women's political ascendency for years. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody. What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining-and thus, the electing-of a woman as president? © 2013, by Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson. The reasons for this are complex and varied, but the authors assert that the question certainly encompasses more than the shortcomings of women candidates or the demands of the particular political moment.

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Woman President : Kristina Horn Sheeler : 9781603449830

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. The implications of this analysis for politics, culture, and the criticism of political communication are addressed. By assembling the disparate discourses of women presidential candidates—campaign oratory, political journalism, punditry, and popular culture—Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson have written a solidly scholarly book that seeks answers to this question. Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture. The reasons for this are complex and varied, but the authors assert that the question certainly encompasses more than the shortcomings of women candidates or the demands of the particular political moment. Examining women's historical and recent presidential campaigns, television and movie depictions of women presidents, and the 2008 Clinton and Palin candidacies, Sheeler and Anderson reveal the hegemonic power wielded by an essentialist white masculinity.

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'Woman President' authors examine factors that have kept women out of the White House: Arts & Humanities: Editor's Picks: Inside IUPUI: Indiana University

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

With a lively and fast-paced writing style, the authors engage their readers in a theoretical discussion confronting 'a rhetoric of postfeminism' that has worked against women winning the White House, especially when women hold the highest political office in many countries around the world. What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president? Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates—one that is expressed in both political and popular culture. Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Cultureidentify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. Pundits have been predicting women's political ascendency for years. What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president? While Hillary Clinton was the early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008 and Sarah Palin was the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, their bids for office were discredited on grounds other than overall qualifications for the jobs, argue two experts in a new book on women who would be president.

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Karrin Vasby Anderson

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

Within that framework, they review women's historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. Their argument is uncompromising and compelling, controversial and persuasive; their book engages and challenges readers across the disciplines. Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates—one that is expressed in both political and popular culture. Everyone seeking a more complete understanding of the Presidency, campaign rhetoric, gender studies, and the role of the media in the portrayal of women in the White House and in coverage of women in campaigns, including the election of 2008, will find the scholarship and analysis in this book of value.

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Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture by Kristina Horn Sheeler

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

And yet, although the 2008 presidential campaign featured Hillary Clinton as an early frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination and Sarah Palin as the first female Republican vice-presidential nominee, no woman has yet held either of the top two offices. We argue that such a style potentially masks the reliance of political image construction on a hegemonic masculinity that serves to preserve politics as a patriarchal system. Instead, the authors identify a pernicious backlash against women presidential candidates—one that is expressed in both political and popular culture. Kristina Horn Sheeler The Office of Academic Affairs and the Faculty Club invite you to attend the Reading at the Table presentation scheduled for Wednesday, November 12, 2014, from 11:30 a. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody. Pundits have been predicting women's political ascendency for years.

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Woman President by Kristina Horn Sheeler (ebook)

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Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. By Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin Vasby Anderson. Everyone seeking a more complete understanding of the Presidency, campaign rhetoric, gender studies, and the role of the media in the portrayal of women in the White House and in coverage of women in campaigns, including the election of 2008, will find the scholarship and analysis in this book of value. In doing so, Woman President takes the reader from Victoria Woodhull's radical outspokenness to Hillary Clinton's carefully choreographed Internet announcement speech of 2008. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody. What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining-and thus, the electing-of a woman as president? The authors provide a cautionary tale for Hillary Clinton and her supporters to consider in a bid for the White House in 2016.

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Woman President (eBook) by Kristina Horn Sheeler, Karrin Vasby Anderson (Author)

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president? A review of convention speeches of candidates from 1980 to 2008 demonstrates a consistent attempt to masculinize the male nominees as a means of showing their fitness for office. Anderson studies the culture of politics and the politics of culture, examining the ways in which political identity is rhetorically constructed and contested in popular media. Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture. Why has America yet to elect a woman president? Please in advance for this event. Her reading will look at what elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president. Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. In doing so, these discourses reified a patriarchal power structure.

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Woman President : Kristina Horn Sheeler : 9781603449830

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

Within that framework, they review women's historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president? Kristina Horn Sheeler, associate professor and chair of the Department of Communication Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, coauthored Governing Codes: Gender, Metaphor, and Political Identity. Pundits have been predicting women's political ascendency for years. The book is well-researched, accessible to a wide audience, and should be read by anyone interested in a better understanding of the presidency, especially in how the expansion of the Office of the Presidency provides an impediment to women successfully winning the highest job in the White House. With a lively and fast-paced writing style, the authors engage their readers in a theoretical discussion confronting 'a rhetoric of postfeminism' that has worked against women winning the White House, especially when women hold the highest political office in many countries around the world. By Kristina Horn Sheeler and Karrin.

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Woman President by Kristina Horn Sheeler (ebook)

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

Publications Books Articles Anderson, Karrin Vasby. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody. Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody. Examining both major-party and third-party campaigns by women, including the 2008 campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, the authors of Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture identify the factors that limit electoral possibilities for women.

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Woman President : Kristina Horn Sheeler : 9781603449830

woman president sheeler kristina horn anderson karrin vasby

They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media, and political parody. What elements of American political and rhetorical culture block the imagining—and thus, the electing—of a woman as president? In doing so, Woman President takes the reader from Victoria Woodhull's radical outspokenness to Hillary Clinton's carefully choreographed Internet announcement speech of 2008. Pundits have been predicting women's political ascendency for years. Karrin Vasby Anderson is Professor of Communication Studies at Colorado State University, where she serves as Director of Graduate Studies and teaches courses in rhetoric, political communication, and gender and communication. Second, these films offer a portrayal of women that marginalizes their status in the political process.

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